Lent through Holy Week

“The Mystery of Lent”

from Dom Gueranger’s “The Liturgical Year”

We may be sure that a season so sacred as this of Lent is rich in mysteries. The Church has made it a time of recollection and penance, in preparation for the greatest of all her feasts; she would, therefore, bring into it everything that could excite the faith of her children, and encourage them to go through the arduous work of atonement for their sins. During Septuagesima, we had the number “seventy”, which reminds us of those seventy years of captivity in Babylon, after which God’s chosen people, being purified from idolatry, was to return to Jerusalem and celebrate the Pasch. It is the number “forty” that the Church now brings before us: a number, as St. Jerome observes, which denotes punishment and affliction.

Let us remember the forty days and forty nights of the deluge sent by God in His anger, when He repented that He had made man, and destroyed the whole human race with the exception of one family. Let us consider how the Hebrew people, in punishment for their ingratitude, wandered forty years in the desert, before they were permitted to enter the promised land. Let us listen to our God commanding the Prophet Ezechiel to lie forty days on his right side, as a figure of the siege which was to bring destruction on Jerusalem.

There are two persons in the old Testament who represent the two manifestations of God: Moses, who typifies the Law; and Elias, who is the figure of the Prophets. Both of these are permitted to approach God: the first on Sinai, the second on Horeb; but both of them have to prepare for the great favour by an expiatory fast of forty days.

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“Now is the time in which the souls of all men should be stirred with greater fervor towards spiritual perfection, and inspired with greater confidence: now when the return of that day on which we were redeemed invites us once more to the fulfillment of all our sacred duties, so that purified in body and soul we may celebrate the supreme Mystery of the Passion of Our Lord…Accordingly, with great solicitude have these divine means been given us, so that these forty days of reflection may assist us to restore the purity of our souls, and so that during them we may, by good works, make satisfaction for our past sins, and by devout mortification, purge ourselves of them…Enter then with pious devotion upon these holy days of Lent; and prepare for yourselves the works of mercy, that you may merit the Divine Mercy.”
-St. Leo the Great

Forgotten Customs of Septuagesima

by Matthew Plese, February 10, 2022 –  from https://onepeterfive.com/forgotten-customs-of-septuagesima/

Brethren: Know you not that they that run in the race, all run indeed, but one receiveth the prize. So run that you may obtain. And every one that striveth for the mastery refraineth himself from all things. And they indeed that they may receive a corruptible crown: but we an incorruptible one. I therefore so run, not as at an uncertainty: I so fight, not as one beating the air. But I chastise my body and bring it into subjection: lest perhaps, when I have preached to others, I myself should become a castaway (1 Cor. 9:24-27 as taken from the Epistle on Septuagesima Sunday).

Septuagesima is the ancient period of time observed for two and a half weeks before the start of Lent. Celebrated on the Third Sunday before the First Sunday in Lent, Septuagesima is both the name of this third Sunday before Lent’s beginning as well as the season itself that runs from this day up until Ash Wednesday. The season of Septuagesima comprises the Sundays of Septuagesima, Sexagesima, and Quinquagesima. The Fourth Council of Orleans in 541 AD documents the existence of this season.

This time, informally called “Pre-Lent,” is a time for us to focus on the need for a Savior. It is a time to prepare a Lenten prayer schedule so that we can determine which extra devotions and Masses we will go to in Lent. It is a time to begin weaning ourselves from food so that we may more easily observe the strictest fast during Lent.

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A God-given opportunity

 
It’s title is: 

‘He gave me everything’: Pro-life hero hailed by his 44 disabled, adopted children

What a wonderful way and encouragement it would be for us to help this dear saint of a man to continue to feed and help these unwanted children. You can do so here: https://www.lifefunder.com/jesusmenino through an end-of-year gift or blessed gift of the New Year – either way you will be saving the lives of those whom very few would care for or about. What a cherished opportunity to support such a God-blessed cause in the midst of this ever-increasing evil world.

God bless you, reward you, and grant you a most blessed and holy New Year.

Mother Miriam of the Lamb of God, O.S.B. and Sisters

Fourth Sunday of Advent

 


From THE LITURGICAL YEAR
Book 1, Advent
LORETO PUBLISHING
Dom Guéranger OSB
First Translation: 1867

 

 

(If this Sunday should fall on December 24, it is omitted, and in its place is said the Office of Christmas Eve, which is not provided here.)

WE have now entered into the week which immediately precedes the birth of the Messias. That long-desired coming might be even tomorrow; and at furthest, that is, when Advent is as long as it can be, the beautiful feast is only seven days from us. So that the Church now counts the hours; she watches day and night, and since December 17 her Offices have assumed an unusual solemnity. At Lauds, she varies the antiphons each day; and at Vespers, in order to express the impatience of her desires for her Jesus, she makes use of the most vehement exclamations to the Messias, in which she each day gives Him a magnificent title, borrowed from the language of the prophets.

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Third Sunday of


From THE LITURGICAL YEAR
Book 1, Advent
LORETO PUBLISHING
Dom Guéranger OSB
First Translation: 1867

TODAY, again, the Church is full of joy, and the joy is greater than it was. It is true that her Lord has not come; but she feels that He is nearer than before, and therefore she thinks it just to lessen somewhat the austerity of this penitential season by the innocent cheerfulness of her sacred rites. And first, this Sunday has had the name of Gaudete given to it, from the first word of the Introit; it also is honored with those impressive exceptions which belong to the fourth Sunday of Lent, called Lætare. The organ is played at the Mass; the vestments are rose-color [optional]; the deacon resumes the dalmatic, and the subdeacon the tunic; and in cathedral churches the bishop assists with the precious miter. How touching are all these usages, and how admirable this condescension of the Church, wherewith she so beautifully blends together the unalterable strictness of the dogmas of faith and the graceful poetry of the formulæ of her liturgy! Let us enter into her spirit, and be glad on this third Sunday of her Advent, because our Lord is now so near unto us. Tomorrow we will resume our attitude of. servants mourning for the absence of their Lord and waiting for Him; for every delay, however short, is painful and makes love sad.



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Second Sunday of

From THE LITURGICAL YEAR,
Book 1, Advent
LORETO PUBLISHING
Dom Guéranger OSB
First Translation: 1867

THE Office of this Sunday is filled, from beginning to end, with the sentiments of hope and joy, with which the soul should be animated at the glad tidings of the speedy coming of Him Who is her Saviour and Spouse. The interior coming, that which is effected in the soul, is the almost exclusive object of the Church’s prayers for this day: let us therefore open our hearts, let us prepare our lamps, and await in gladness that cry, which will be heard in the midnight: ‘Glory be to God! Peace unto men!’



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Out from Heaven’s Palaces

Beloved, I’ve spent a good part of today crying over the two videos below; they are so very beautiful and demonstrate beyond all imagining the truth, strength, and power of God’s love for us.

A number of you heard that I’ve spent the past two weeks in and out of the hospital – actually two hospitals. I’m home three days now and healing, although slowly and am still quite sick to my stomach. I had gone in for a somewhat routine colonoscopy almost two weeks ago, during which my spleen was accidentally lacerated. It sent quite a bit of blood into my system which they say will take a number of weeks to heal.

I’m doing better with each day and awoke this morning with the song below in the video on my heart. I’m not often prone to crying, but cried non-stop at the words and, to me, familiar music of this hymn. What grace is this that brought Our Savior down! May we never get over it – and, please God, never get used to it or take His love and grace for granted.

The second video about the Eucharistic miracle is, I think, the most beautiful and moving one I have ever seen. Some years ago, I was invited on a tour of 13 Eucharistic miracles throughout Italy, including Lanciano. The video of this one from Venezuela has moved me more than any before.

These beautiful videos are an enormous gift to us – reminding us that whatever happens in our lives, in the world or in the Church, the gates of Hell will never prevail against the Church and nothing, not the devil himself, can ever separate or keep us from the love of God in Christ.

I pray you will bask in Our Savior’s love watching these videos and send them out to all you know, unbelievers too. He died for every soul.

Our love and prayers to you with deep gratitude to all who have been praying for my recovery. Our God is faithful.

Mother Miriam of the Lamb of God, O.S.B.

A Higher Chivalry and a True Vocation

Beloved, I am aware that the previous video I attempted to send was taken down before it reached most of you. I have just now come across the video below which I wish could be shared with the entire world. I truly believe that our time on earth, at least the time in which we can live out our Faith apart from persecution, is growing shorter with each day. What of those who have never heard the Gospel? What of those (including members of our own family and friends) who will die without Christ?

A few figures should haunt us:

  • The world population as of today is close to 8 billion
  • The estimate of those who have never heard the Gospel is 2 billion
  • An estimated 70,000 die each day without Christ

I cannot imagine any Christian responding, “What does that have to do with me?” How is it possible that the grace of God, the free gift of salvation in Christ, has reached us and stopped there? How can we, by our silence or by our unChristian behavior, rob others of what we have so freely received and which is meant for every creature?

We MUST share the Gospel. And to the extent we are hindered, support those who will give their very lives to the end that souls can be saved. 

Here in Beloit, Kansas, our beginning Priory will hold only 13 women. I am asking Our Lord for an army – as many as God would call. We have plenty of land to build a monastery – we need only resources to build and women who will give all to live for Christ, for the restoration of the family and the salvation of millions of souls. 

Please watch the video below and then send it to every young man and woman whom Christ may be calling to the priesthood and consecrated life.

We have little time left – truly, today is the day of salvation. We have only to hear His Voice and heed His Call while it is yet day.

We pray God’s blessings on each of you and your families that your deepest needs may be met in Him.

Mother Miriam of the Lamb of God, O.S.B.