The Feast of the Epiphany

aka: The Twelfth Night

The Epiphany by Edward Burne-Jones, 1888

We bless our friends at Fish Eaters for their magnificent work of teaching and leading us through all the Feasts of the Liturgical year. Please do take a tour through their website (fisheaters.com). Your Faith will be immeasurably enriched!

The Eve of the Feast of the Epiphany is the twelfth day of Christmas, and tonight is known as”Twelfth Night” (or “Twelfthnight”). It begins the celebration of Christ’s revealing His Divinity in three ways, which is formally celebrated tomorrow:

  • to the Magi who, guided by the great and mysterious Star of Bethlehem, came to visit Him when He was a Baby (Matthew 2:1-19)
  • through His Baptism by St. John, when “the Spirit of God descending as a dove” came upon Him and there was heard a voice from Heaven saying, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased” (Matthew 3, Mark 1, Luke 3, John 1), and all Three Persons of the Most Holy Trinity were manifest (Note: the Baptism of Our Lord is also commemorated on the 13th of January)
  • through His first public miracle – that of the wedding at Cana when Our Lord turned water into wine at the request of His Mother (John 2). Just as God’s first miracle before the Egyptian pharaoh, through Moses, was turning the waters of the Nile into blood, Our Lord’s first miracle was turning water into wine.

In many Catholic homes (especially Italian ones), it’s not Christmas Day that is for giving presents to children, but the Feast of Epiphany, when the gifts are given in a way related to the Magi. So today will have a “feel” of Christmas Eve, and because of the Epiphany’s association with the Magis’ gift-giving, tomorrow is often referred to colloquially as the “Little Christmas.”

It is today that the Three Kings should reach the creche (heretofore, they should be kept away from it) and that Baby Jesus should be adorned with signs of royalty, such as a crown, ermine, and gold or purple cloth. Set up golden candlesticks around the manger where He lies.

Along with the crowns, scepters, gold, and royal purple, peacocks are also a symbol for the day. They are more generally a symbol of immortality (and therefore a good symbol for Easter, too), but also a symbol of royalty and of the glory revealed by Christ today. The most profound symbols of all, though, are light as a symbol of theophany; wine in memory of the miracle at the wedding in Cana; water and the dove in memory of Christ’s Baptism by St. John; the Three Kings, their gifts, and the Star of Bethlehem.

The Magi and Their Gifts

Typified in the Old Testament by the Queen of Saba (Sheba), who entered Jerusalem “with a great train, and riches, and camels that carried spices, and an immense quantity of gold, and precious stones” in order to ascertain King Solomon’s greatness (III Kings 10), the three Magi entered Jerusalem bearing gold, frankincense, and myrrh for the newborn King. The Fathers see in their gifts omens of Christ’s life:

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10 Ways to Really Have a

Happy New Year!

Beloved, I came across the article below and wanted to share it with you. It was written in 2014 by Father Peter Carota, a beloved priest of the Diocese of Stockton, California, who went home to his eternal rest in July of 2016. The initial title of Father’s article read:  “10 Ways to Really Have a Happy (Traditional Catholic) New Year.” I pray Father will not mind my omitting the words “Traditional Catholic.” What Father proposes is the only way to have a Happy New Year, whether or not one considers themselves to be a “Traditional” Catholic or a Catholic at all. Here is wisdom from above, which is the only source of true wisdom and means to eternal life.

We wish each of you a most blessed and holy New Year in the One who makes all things new!

Mother Miriam of the Lamb of God, O.S.B. and Daughters

1) Become Holy.
Without Holiness there is no Happiness.  Since Catholics and atheists all say “Happy New Year,” we, at least, truly know that the road to happiness is only through a life of holiness and sacrifice. That entails a firm commitment to grow in a deeper union with God. This will require making and taking time to pray and read the Bible. We want to be saints and help others be saints.

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